School of Public Health

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UW study: oral swab testing shows potential in Tuberculosis detection

ASPPH, Friday, May 10, 2019

Oral swab tests for tuberculosis (TB) can be as accurate as existing diagnostic methods, such as sputum tests, which are more expensive and invasive and potentially more dangerous for health workers, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health. “This approach could facilitate point-of-care diagnostic strategies and greatly simplify the care of patients,” said senior author Dr. Gerard Cangelosi, an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology at UW.

Food labeling needs harmonized and nutrient-rich profiling

Euractiv, Friday, May 3, 2019

Energy-dense foods are cheap while nutrient-rich foods cost more, and this imbalance is at the root of the global obesity pandemic. Dr. Adam Drewnowski, a professor with UW's Department of Epidemiology, suggests that policymakers adopt harmonized nutrient-rich profiling on food labeling in order to address this matter. 

Head injuries on rise with rental scooters and low helmet use

KOMO News, Friday, May 3, 2019

Injury-prevention specialists are saying if you ride a rental scooters, or bike, it is time to put a helmet on. Dr. Frederick Rivara, adjunct faculty with UW's Department of Epidemiology, says that most, if not all, injuries in association with rental scooters and bikes could be avoided with proper helmet use.

UW researchers find that higher levels of income inequality correspond to higher rates of firearm homicide across US counties

The Daily, Thursday, May 2, 2019

According to a study by UW researchers in the Department of Epidemiology and at Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center, high levels of income inequality may have negative consequences beyond economic insecurity that are not often considered. The study found that counties in the United States with higher levels of income inequality experienced higher rates of firearm-related homicides than counties with lower levels of income inequality.

UW study: new links identified between breastfeeding and breast cancer risk among Hispanic women

ASPPH, Thursday, May 2, 2019

In the largest study to date of reproductive factors and breast cancer risk in Hispanic women, UW researchers have found notable links between breastfeeding and reduced risk of breast cancer. The researchers pooled data for nearly 6,000 Hispanic women and found that women with a history of breastfeeding had a 17 percent lower risk of breast cancer. “There is a wealth of data showing that women who breastfeed have a reduced risk of developing breast cancer,” said Dr. Amanda Phipps, an assistant professor of Epidemiology at the University of Washington.

UW epidemiologist awarded RWJF grant to study impact of soda taxes on low-income communities

ASPPH, Thursday, May 2, 2019

Dr. Jesse Jones-Smith, associate professor of health services and epidemiology at UW, was recently awarded a $200,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assess the impact of sugary drink taxes and tax revenues on low-income families and their communities. In the study, Dr. Jones-Smith along with fellow researchers will examine the extent to which taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages are regressive.

A new study links sugary drinks with disease, but the reality is more complicated

The Seattle Times, Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The sugar sweetened-beverages study, published in March in the journal Circulation, is one of many on associations between diet and lifestyle habits and the onset of various disease in participants of the long-running Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. “Do these beverages increase the risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease? That’s a good question,” said Mario Kratz, Ph.D., a faculty member at the University of Washington.

New links found among breastfeeding and breast cancer risk in Hispanic women

UW SPH, Monday, April 29, 2019

In the largest study to date of reproductive factors and breast cancer risk in Hispanic women, researchers have found important links between breastfeeding and a reduced risk of breast cancer. “There is a wealth of data showing that women who breastfeed have a reduced risk of developing breast cancer,” said Amanda Phipps, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the UW School of Public Health. “Through this study, we were able to extend these findings to an important but understudied population: Hispanic women.”

UW study finds depression, dementia and unsafe firearm storage as risk for elderly

ASPPH, Thursday, April 25, 2019

Nearly one-fourth of adults aged 65 or older in Washington State live in households where firearms are kept unlocked and loaded, according to a new report by researchers of UW's School of Public Health. “As people age, dementia and depression can set in, especially for older adults who are socially isolated,” said Erin Morgan, lead author of the study and a doctoral student in the School’s Department of Epidemiology. “These conditions can cause suicidal thoughts, confusion or agitation, resulting in some life-threatening situations when there’s easy access to a firearm,” she continued.

UW researchers awarded RWJF grant to study the impact of soda taxes on low-income areas

UW SPH, Tuesday, April 23, 2019

UW epidemiology associate professor Jesse Jones-Smith is among two researchers awarded a $200,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to assess the impact of sugary drink taxes and tax revenues on low-income families and their communities.