School of Public Health

Epi In the NewsSubscribe to Epi In the News

Mom's birthplace can affect her baby's birth weight

UW Health Sciences NewsBeat, Thursday, April 6, 2017

A new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health found that within certain racial and ethnic groups, women born outside the United States had a lower risk of having a low birth weight baby than their native-born counterparts, even after controlling for common pregnancy complications. PhD candidate Paige Wartko, who led the study, was quoted.

Fruit Juice Not Linked to Obesity in Children, Washington Study Finds

ASPPH, Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health looked at the link between fruit juice and weight gain in children, and discovered that there’s not much to worry about. Dr. Brandon Auerbach conducted the study as a graduate student in the School’s department of epidemiology.

Sarepta Therapeutics Announces Appointment of Catherine Stehman-Breen, M.D., M.S. as Chief Medical Officer

Global Newswire, Monday, April 3, 2017

Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc., a commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of unique RNA-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of rare neuromuscular diseases, today announced the appointment of Catherine Stehman-Breen, M.D., M.S., as chief medical officer. Dr. Stehman-Breen is an alumna of the Department of Epidemiology.

Washington: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Low Birth Weight Differ by Maternal Birthplace

ASPPH, Thursday, March 30, 2017

A UW-led study published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal found that within certain racial and ethnic groups, women born outside the U.S. had a lower risk of having a low birth weight baby than their native-born counterparts, even after controlling for common pregnancy complications. PhD candidate Paige Wartko, who led the study, was quoted.

Fruit Juice, in Moderation, Not Tied to Obesity in Children

The New York Times, Monday, March 27, 2017

A new study finds that drinking 100% fruit juice in moderation does not cause excessive weight gain in children. Epi Alumnus Brandon Auerbach, who led the study, is quoted.

Will 100% fruit juice make your child gain weight?

CNN, Thursday, March 23, 2017

A study published in the the journal Pediatrics explores the relationship between the consumption of 100% fruit juice and weight gain in children between the ages of one and six. Epi alumnus Brandon Auerbach is quoted.

Washington Biostatistician Helps Highlight Successful Strategy to Curb Future Ebola Outbreaks

ASPPH, Wednesday, March 22, 2017

In 2014 and 2015, Ebola spread through West Africa like wildfire, affecting nearly 29,000 people and killing more than 11,000. During the course of the epidemic, researchers identified an experimental Ebola vaccine that provided 100 percent protection against the disease. Dr. Elizabeth (Betz) Halloran, a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health, along with a collaboration of researchers, investigated whether this same ring vaccination strategy can curb future Ebola outbreaks or other emerging disease threats. 

What you need to know about colon cancer (video)

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Monday, March 20, 2017

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. In a Facebook Live video, assistant professor Amanda Phipps discussed colorectal cancer, prevention tips and her research.

Asthma study hopes 
to improve disease management among Valley children

Yakima Herald, Monday, March 20, 2017

With spring coming on fast, bringing more pollen in the air and more dust stirred up by agriculture, asthma is sure to kick into high gear for many in the Yakima Valley. But in a study Farm Workers is doing with the UW, researchers and clinicians are looking for ways to minimize the effects of the respiratory condition in local children. Catherine Karr is quoted.

9 Healthy Foods That Cost Less Than $1 Per Serving

TIME, Friday, March 17, 2017

Great news for anyone who wants to save money and eat healthier—in other words, pretty much all of us. A new study suggests that it really is possible to do both at once. The secret? Cook more at home. Study comes from the UW School of Public Health. Department of Epidemiology Acting Assistant Professor Anju Aggarwal is quoted.