School of Public Health

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Genetic Health Risks: 23andMe

KOMO 4, Thursday, July 27, 2017

University of Washington medical geneticist and Department of Epidemiology adjunct professor Gail Jarvik urges caution when interpreting consumer genetic tests from 23andMe for conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

The Truth about Mammograms

TruTV, Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Over half of U.S. women who get annual mammograms will experience a false positive within a decade. Dr. Joann Elmore, adjunct professor of epidemiology, is featured.

Only 3 In 5 Gun Owners Have Received Firearms Training

Mother Jones, Monday, July 24, 2017

Forty percent of America’s gun owners have not received any formal firearms training, according to a new study from the University of Washington (UW) School of Public Health.​ Associate Professor Ali Rowhani-Rahbar led the study and is quoted.

Washington: Three in Five Gun Owners Receive Firearm Trainings; Fewer Learn About Suicide Prevention

ASPPH, Thursday, July 20, 2017

The United States does not have a national standard or requirement for firearm safety training prior to purchasing a gun, putting the responsibility on gun owners and those who live with them to find ways to learn firearm safety. Only about three in five firearm owners have received any formal gun training, according to a new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, associate professor of epidemiology, led the study and is quoted.

4 Out of 10 Self-Defense Handgun Owners Have Received No Formal Firearms Training

The Trace, Tuesday, July 18, 2017

More Americans than ever before own firearms for protection, but the percentage of people who undergo formal training on how to use their weapons has flatlined, a new paper published in the journal Injury Prevention shows. Associate Professor Ali Rowhani-Rahbar led the study and is quoted.

Depression among young teens linked to cannabis use at 18

HSNewsBeat, Monday, July 17, 2017

Young people with chronic or severe depression are at elevated risk for developing a problem with cannabis in later adolescence, new research indicates. Issac Rhew, lead researcher and adjunct research assistant professor, is quoted.

Mixing opioids and sedatives steeply raises overdose risk

HSNewsBeat, Monday, July 17, 2017

Patients who are prescribed opioids and sedating drugs such as benzodiazepines and muscle relaxants, drugs commonly prescribed for back pain, are at a significantly higher risk of dying of an overdose than people on opioids alone, researchers from the University of Washington and Washington State Department of Labor and Industries have found. ​Renuka Garg, UW Epi PhD graduate, led the study. 

Washington: Maternal Lifestyle Behaviors Impact Risk of Gestational Diabetes & Child Obesity

ASPPH, Thursday, July 13, 2017

It isn’t enough to just quit smoking during pregnancy, say researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Expecting mothers should consider the impact several lifestyle behaviors have on their health and the well-being of their child. Dr. Sylvia Badon, who conducted the research as part of her graduate program in the School’s Department of Epidemiology, is quoted.

Firearm-safety class rates in U.S. little changed in 20 years

HSNewsBeat, Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Only about three in five U.S. firearm owners have received any formal gun training, according to a new study from the University of Washington. ​Associate professor Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar led the study and is quoted.

Preserving the Fogarty International Center — Benefits for Americans and the World

New England Journal of Medicine, Thursday, July 6, 2017

In his proposed budget for fiscal year 2018, President Donald Trump recommended eliminating the Fogarty International Center (FIC) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Although the NIH actually received increased funding in the fiscal year 2017 budget that was signed on May 5, the FIC — a leader of U.S. global health research efforts for the past 50 years — may be vulnerable in upcoming negotiations over the 2018 budget. ​Dr. Paul Drain, adjunct assistant professor, co-authored the article.