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Americans lose when funds for global health research are cut

The Seattle Times, Sunday, May 14, 2017

There is a perception that global health programs take taxpayer dollars out of the U.S. and helps other countries but not us. This perception is incorrect.​ Jennify Slyker, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology, authored this opinion piece.

Core faculty member elected to SAVIR board of directors

HIPRC News, Friday, May 12, 2017

HIPRC core faculty member and associate professor of epidemiology Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, has been elected to the board of directors for the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research. SAVIR promotes research, collaboration and advocacy focused on the prevention and treatment of violence and injury. Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center is a member center of SAVIR alongside institutions from across the country.

Initiative announces Graduate Student Conference Travel Awards

Population Health Initiative, Thursday, May 11, 2017

The Population Health Initiative has awarded 13 Graduate Student Conference Travel Awards, which are intended to further the academic, research, or professional goals of graduate students as they strive to become the next generation of leaders in population health.​ Four of the awarded students study in the Department of Epidemiology.

Health Officials: Dangerous drug linked to increasing overdose deaths

Q13 FOX, Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Local health officials on Wednesday warned the public about a drug that can kill users in a matter of seconds. The drug is called fentanyl and experts said it’s 50 times stronger than heroin, and it’s already on the streets of Western Washington.​ Jeff Duchin, adjunct professor, is quoted.

Anne Lund, MPH, RD, received the 2017 Washington State Outstanding Dietitian of the Year Award

Nutritional Sciences Program, Wednesday, May 10, 2017

At their annual conference, the Washington State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (WSAND) honored Anne Lund, MPH, RD, with the Outstanding Dietitian of the Year Award for 2017. This award is the most prestigious recognition given by WSAND and highlights notable leadership, ability, and service.​ Anne Lund is a senior lecturer in the Department of Epidemiology.

Washington: Air Pollution May Lower Levels of ‘Good’ Cholesterol, Increase Risk of Heart Disease

ASPPH, Wednesday, May 10, 2017

People living near heavily trafficked roadways may be at higher risk of heart disease due to fine particles in the air that lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as “good” cholesterol, according to a new study from the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Griffith Bell is the lead author of the study and conducted the research as a doctoral student in the School’s Department of Epidemiology.

Washington Researcher Highlights Importance of Antibiotic for Preventing Spread of Malaria

ASPPH, Thursday, May 4, 2017

A low-cost antibiotic used to treat and prevent infections, including in people living with HIV, may decrease the burden of malaria in vulnerable communities, according to a new study co-authored by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Professor of epidemiology, Grace John-Stewart is quoted.

Washington Researcher Highlights Importance of Antibiotic for Preventing Spread of Malaria

ASPPH, Thursday, May 4, 2017

A low-cost antibiotic used to treat and prevent infections, including in people living with HIV, may decrease the burden of malaria in vulnerable communities, according to a new study co-authored by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Grace John-Stewart, professor of epidemiology and global health at the UW School of Public Health, is quoted.

Common malaria meds pose no undue risk in early pregnancy

HSNewsBeat, Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), medications widely used against malaria, are safe to administer to women in their first trimester of pregnancy, according to research published today. ACTs had previously been recommended at that stage of pregnancy only in life-saving circumstances.​ Epi adjunct professor Andy Stergachis led the study and is quoted in the story.

Washington Study: Crooked Bite May Indicate Early Life Stress

ASPPH, Thursday, April 27, 2017

New research from the University of Washington suggests that crooked bites and teeth may be a novel marker for early life stress. Dr. Philippe Hujoel, a professor in the UW School of Dentistry and an adjunct professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health, led the study.