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Washington researchers find fringe loan use linked to poor health

ASPPH, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Fringe loan services may cost poor and working class Americans not only their finances, but also their health, a first-of-its-kind study shows. Researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health and the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance led the study. Jerzy Eisenberg-Guyot, a P.h.D. student, is the lead author. Anjum Hajat, associate professor of epidemiology, is the senior author.

People using payday loans more likely to report poor health, study finds

The Guardian, Monday, March 5, 2018

People who borrow from short-term, high-interest lenders such as payday loan companies are 38% more likely to rate their health as poor or fair, a new report has found. Lead author and P.h.D. student, Jerzy Eisenberg-Guyot is quoted.

Scientists say there’s a link between taking out ‘fringe loans’ and reporting health woes

GeekWire, Monday, March 5, 2018

In a newly published study, University of Washington researchers report that people who use fringe loan services, or don’t have access to a bank account, are more likely to say they feel less healthy. Jerzy Eisenberg-Guyot, lead author and P.h.D. student, is quoted.

Fringe loan use linked to poor health

UW Medicine Newsroom, Monday, March 5, 2018

Fringe loan services may cost poor and working class Americans not only their finances, but also their health, a first-of-its-kind study shows. Researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health and the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance led the study. Doctoral student, Jerzy Eisenberg-Guyot, and associate professor of epidemiology, Anjum Hajat, are quoted.

Q&A with Dr. Jeff Duchin: Communicable disease outbreaks show homeless at increased risk

Public Health Insider, Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Public Health is currently responding to increases in several infectious diseases in King County that particularly affect people living homeless. These diseases include group A streptococcal infections, Shigella, and a cluster of serious infections transmitted by body lice called Bartonella quintana. We sat down with Dr. Jeff Duchin, Health Officer and Chief of Communicable Disease Epidemiology and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington, to better understand these outbreaks and why living homeless can put a person at increased risk for infection.

Structural inequality, internalized racism, and silent deaths

The Daily (UW), Monday, February 26, 2018

Black American mothers are bearing the brunt of a crisis in this country. The crisis: The United States has the highest maternal mortality rate of any developed country, and the rate is only getting higher. Daniel Enquobahrie, associate professor of epidemiology is quoted.

Washington Researcher Calls for ‘Population Neuroscience’ Approach to Dementia Research in Report

ASPPH, Thursday, February 22, 2018

According to a group of international researchers, including Dr. Walter Kukull from the University of Washington School of Public Health, an interdisciplinary population-focused approach to this public health issue is needed to push scientific discovery forward. Kukull is a professor of epidemiology.

Recast the study of dementia to be more population-focused

UW Medicine Newsroom, Wednesday, February 21, 2018

A group of international researchers, including professor of epidemiology Walter Kukull, proposes an population-focused approach to this public health issue to advance scientific discovery. In a special report published in Alzheimer’s Disease and Associated Disorders, the researchers recommend reframing the study of dementia epidemiology as “population neuroscience.” 

Dr. Carolyn Hutter to lead NHGRI's Division of Genome Sciences

National Human Genome Research Institute, Tuesday, February 20, 2018

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has appointed Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D., the director of the Division of Genome Sciences - the NHGRI division that leads research aiming to understand the function of the human genome in health and disease, and seeks technologies that facilitate genomic discoveries. Dr. Hutter received her doctoral degree through the University of Washington's Department of Epidemiology.

Jean D. Brender, PhD, RN, Presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who's Who

Chicago Evening Post, Monday, February 19, 2018

Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, presented Jean D. Brender, PhD, RN, with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. Brender is a professor emerita of epidemiology and biostatistics and former associate dean of research at Texas A&M University in the school of public health. She received her PhD in epidemiology at the University of Washington in 1983.