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Asthma study hopes 
to improve disease management among Valley children

Yakima Herald, Monday, March 20, 2017

With spring coming on fast, bringing more pollen in the air and more dust stirred up by agriculture, asthma is sure to kick into high gear for many in the Yakima Valley. But in a study Farm Workers is doing with the UW, researchers and clinicians are looking for ways to minimize the effects of the respiratory condition in local children. Catherine Karr is quoted.

9 Healthy Foods That Cost Less Than $1 Per Serving

TIME, Friday, March 17, 2017

Great news for anyone who wants to save money and eat healthier—in other words, pretty much all of us. A new study suggests that it really is possible to do both at once. The secret? Cook more at home. Study comes from the UW School of Public Health. Department of Epidemiology Acting Assistant Professor Anju Aggarwal is quoted.

Should Seattle tax sugary drinks? Here’s what the health research says — and doesn’t say

The Seattle Times, Monday, March 13, 2017

Mayor Ed Murray has proposed a tax on sugary drinks to reduce the consumption and improve the health of Seattle residents. The money raised from the tax would fund education programs dedicated to improving the graduation rate of minority youth. Adam Drewnowski, professor of epidemiology and director of the UW's Center for Public Health Nutrition, was quoted.

The FDA asks: Can ‘healthy’ be redefined?

89.3 KPCC, Wednesday, March 8, 2017

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is considering ways to modernize the use of the term "healthy" on food products. Adam Drewnowski, professor of epidemiology and director of UW's Center for Public Health Nutrition, weighs in on how the FDA should approach redefining the term.

Washington Professor Receives More than $590,000 Grant for Gun Violence Research

ASPPH Friday Letter, Thursday, February 23, 2017

Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health, was recently awarded a $590,676 grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation to study health interventions for survivors of gun violence.

LEEP Rather Than Freeze to Prevent Cervical Cancer

MEDPAGE TODAY, Thursday, February 16, 2017

A UW Epidemiology-led study finds that cryotherapy is less effective than loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP)​ in fighting cervical precancer. The results of the study comparing the two treatments were presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in February. Sharon A. Greene, an epi PhD student, is featured.

For HIV–positive women, cryotherapy less effective than LEEP in fighting cervical precancer

Infectious Disease News, Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Cryotherapy was associated with a significantly higher risk of recurrence of cervical precancer in women with HIV than a costlier electric excision process, according to a 3-year study. The results of the study comparing cryotherapy and loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) were presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) by Sharon Greene, graduate student in the Department of Epidemiology.

For HIV–positive women, cryotherapy less effective than LEEP in fighting cervical precancer

Healio, Wednesday, February 15, 2017

A study comparing the two treatments revealed that the costlier method, loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LOOP), lowered the risk of reoccurance of cervical precancer in HIV-positive women. The results of the study were presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in February. Sharon A. Greene, an epi PhD student, is quoted.

CATCH study aims to treat HIV-infected children before symptoms appear

UW Daily, Monday, February 13, 2017

The HIV Counseling and Testing for Children at Home (CATCH) study is concluding its final study after several years of conducting research in various parts of Kenya. The study does exactly as it name suggests — it tries to “catch” children who may be infected with HIV but are still asymptomatic and tries to treat them. Anjuli Wagner, Epi alumna, is quoted.

Washington Researchers Find New Pathway Linking Diet and Cancer Risk

ASPPH Friday Letter, Friday, February 10, 2017

A low-calorie, low-fat diet, with or without exercise, could reduce the risk of cancer in women by lowering levels of oxidative stress, according to researchers from the UW School of Public Health and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Department of Epidemiology Research Professor, Anne McTiernan, is quoted.