School of Public Health

EPI 320 INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY

EPI 320 Introduction To Epidemiology (4) NW

For the undergraduate student wishing to devote only one quarter to a course in epidemiologic methods. Description of ways in which variation in disease occurrence is documented and how that variation is studied to understand causes of disease. Prerequisite: either BIOST 310, QMETH 201, Q SCI 381, STAT 220, STAT/CS&SS/SOC 221, or STAT 311, any of which may be taken concurrently. Offered: WSp.

Winter 2018

Line Number Section ID Credits Days/Times Room/Bldg Instructor
14585A4.0Monday, Wednesday @ 3:30pm - 5:20pmT625 (HST)Kristjana H Asbjornsdottir

Additional Course Details

This course is an introduction to epidemiology--the queen of the public health sciences. 

Topics Covered

Measures of Disease Occurrence; Patterns of Disease; Rate Adjustment; Infectious Disease and Outbreak Investigation; Epidemiologic Study Design; Randomized Controlled Trials; Cohort Studies; Life-table Analysis; Case-Control Studies; Screening

Learning Objectives

To describe, define and apply basic concepts of disease transmission and occurrence; To recognize appropriate data sources for epidemiologic study; To define, compute and interpret measures of disease occurrence to solve problems and design epidemiologic studies; To distinguish between random and systematic error in the interpretation and design of epidemiologic studies; To recognize and apply appropriate research study designs and to compare and contrast their individual advantages; To define, compute and interpret measures of association and excess risk to solve problems and critique epidemiologic studies; To define, compute and interpret concepts associated with disease screening; To demonstrate integration of epidemiologic concepts through the critique of an existing published study.

Course Format

Lecture and group discussion

How You Are Evaluated

Students will be graded based on homework exercises; data analysis and interpretation assignments; discussion section quizzes; “clicker questions” during lectures; “minute papers” during discussion sections; a mid-term and final examination.

Contact the Instructor

Jack Goldberg (goldie1@uw.edu)