School of Public Health

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Seattle health workers march to expose racism as a health crisis

Crosscut, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Thousands of health care professionals gathered on June 6 at Harborview Medical Center in solidarity with Seattle’s Black community. Many of them wore white coats and scrubs, and some were demonstrating for the first time since anti-racist protests started in late May, incited by the filmed death of a Minneapolis man, George Floyd, at the hands of police. UW epidemiologist Dr. Jen Balkus is quoted.

When It Works to ‘Defund the Police’

The New York Times, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

The notion of defunding the police has been a central component at many protests across the United States. Understand, however, the plan is not to get rid of all police. UW epidemiology professor Dr. Ali Mokdad is quoted.

When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again

The New York Times, Monday, June 8, 2020

Many epidemiologists are already comfortable going to the doctor, socializing with small groups outside or bringing in mail, despite the coronavirus. But unless there’s an effective vaccine or treatment first, it will be more than a year before many say they will be willing to go to concerts, sporting events or religious services. And some may never greet people with hugs or handshakes again. UW epidemiology professor Dr. Steve Mooney is quoted.

After months of pleading for social distancing, health officials support protests. Seattle Black Lives Matter warns of dangers

The Seattle Times, Friday, June 5, 2020

Just a couple weeks ago, it would have been the stuff of public health professionals’ nightmares: Thousands of people clustered together amid a pandemic, chanting, shouting, and, after police hit them with tear gas, coughing. But that was before Minneapolis police officers killed George Floyd, and before the week of protests against police violence and institutional racism that have erupted in Seattle and across the nation. UW epidemiology faculty members Drs. Jared Baeten and Jen Balkus are quoted.

Experts across campus discuss future of food supply system

The Daily, Thursday, June 4, 2020

With grocery outlets across the country preparing for potential meat shortages due to COVID-19, some are wondering whether other aspects of the food supply chain are under threat. The Graduate School’s Office of Public Lectures, calling on three UW experts, took on that question in a May 28 YouTube livestream as part of its series about COVID-19. UW professor of epidemiology Dr. Adam Drewnowski is quoted.

Thinking about traveling again? Here’s how to assess the risks

Vox, Friday, May 29, 2020

People are starting to commute and travel again, but no transportation mode is risk-free. UW epidemiology professor Dr. Jared Baeten is quoted in this article.

UW launches online training for contact tracing to help fight COVID-19

UW News, Friday, May 29, 2020

As businesses and public spaces reopen across the nation, the old-school public health detective work known as contact tracing is becoming a major component of the battle to contain the novel coronavirus that causes the deadly COVID-19 disease. UW epidemiology professor Dr. Janet Baseman is quoted in this article.

Half of newly diagnosed coronavirus cases in Washington are in people under 40

The Seattle Times, Thursday, May 28, 2020

Half of new coronavirus infections in Washington are now occurring in people under the age of 40, a marked shift from earlier in the epidemic when more than two-thirds of those testing positive were in older age groups. UW epidemiology faculty members Drs. Judith Malmgren and Jeff Duchin are quoted in this article.

Study provides insight on preventing COVID-19 outbreaks in retirement living facilities

SPH News, Wednesday, May 27, 2020

A UW research team investigated an independent and assisted living community in Seattle, Washington, after two of its residents were hospitalized with COVID-19 and social distancing and other preventive measures were subsequently implemented. The researchers found that symptom screening of the residents did not identify those infected with COVID-19, as most of the elders in the study who tested positive for the novel coronavirus did not experience a fever, cough or other problems common with the disease. UW epidemiology assistant professor Dr. Alison Roxby is quoted.

Studying the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations in Africa

SPH News, Wednesday, May 27, 2020

A new project led by Dr. Judd Walson, a professor of epidemiology and global health at UW, has received nearly $1.4 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to monitor the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Africa and how it effects vulnerable populations.