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Fear, stigma, ignorance keep AIDS epidemic going

VOA News, Friday, November 30, 2018

Fear, stigma and ignorance. The World Health Organization says these are the reasons the AIDS epidemic is not over because doctors can treat HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. With treatment, no one needs to die from AIDS, and those with the virus can't give it to someone else. In addition, with prevention therapy, no one needs to get infected. The article interviewed Epi professor Dr. Jared Baeten, an HIV specialist who notes that even with these tools we're not there yet. 

Public health critical to addressing gun violence epidemic

Yale School of Medicine, Friday, November 30, 2018

Gun control activists speaking at a Yale School of Public Health forum urged public health professionals to join their efforts in combating the pervasive gun violence that has become a major public health threat across the country. Some have questioned whether gun violence belongs in the public health realm. The department's own Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar,  M.P.H. ’05, a nationally-known violence prevention epidemiologist, told the large gathering that there is absolutely no question gun violence is a public health concern. The statistics he presented to back up his claim were sobering.

Washington: alcohol misuse and unsafely-stored firearms could be a dangerous mix for children

ASPPH, Thursday, November 29, 2018

A new study led by the University of Washington School of Public Health suggests that children living in a firearm-owning household in which a firearm has not been safely stored are at increased risk of self-harm and interpersonal violence. “This research indicates the need for improved firearm storage in homes with children,” said Ms. Erin Morgan, lead author and PhD candidate here in the Epi department. “Kids who live in a household with an adult who misuses alcohol are more likely to live with an unsafely stored firearm.

Truvada may be getting unfairly blamed for the spread of STDs

Tonic, Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Truvada, the brand name of a daily HIV prevention pill known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is becoming increasingly popular around the world among men who have sex with men. In city after city, public health officials and doctors have begun crediting PrEP with helping to dramatically reduce HIV transmission rates. Yet, there is ongoing backlash by many who claim the pill leads to a rise in other STIs by encouraging gay and bisexual men to forgo the use of condoms.

UW study reveals dangerous association between guns, kids, and alcohol abuse

KIRO 7, Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Expanding on a previous study which found a majority of guns are not safely stored by owners in Washington, new research further notes that alcohol misuse adds to this danger, especially when children are in the home. UW’s new study, led by Graduate Research Assistant and PhD candidate Erin Morgan, sought to determine the “association between unsafe firearm storage and exposure to adult alcohol misuse.” It considered data from 5,530 participants.

UW researchers discover discrepancy between public perception and reality of violence involving firearms

UW Daily, Monday, November 19, 2018

Last month, researchers in the Department of Epidemiology at the UW School of Public Health - including PhD candidate Erin Morgan - published a study along with researchers from Harvard University and Northeastern University which found that, while suicide by firearm is twice as common in the United States as homicide by firearm, public perception reflects the opposite. The majority of Americans believe that more violent deaths in the United States are a result of homicides.

Alcohol, firearms and kids: a dangerous mix

UW Medicine Newsroom, Monday, November 19, 2018

Children living with an adult gun owner who misuses alcohol are at increased risk of self-harm and interpersonal violence, a recent study found. Guns in such households sometimes are loaded and not safely stored, according to the study by UW Medicine’s Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and the University of Washington’s School of Public Health. “This research indicates the need for improved firearm storage in homes with children,” said Erin Morgan, lead author and a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at the UW School of Public Health.

Washington faculty co-authors modeling study showing PrEP impact among sexual minority males

ASPPH, Thursday, November 15, 2018
Adolescent males who identify as gay or bisexual, or are sexually active with other males, are at high risk for HIV infection. Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) say pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) programs can significantly reduce this risk, especially in communities with high HIV burden. The study, published online Nov. 1 in the American Journal of Public Health, was co-authored by Dr. Steven Goodreau, a UW professor of anthropology and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health. 

Washington researcher elected to board of Infectious Diseases Society of America

ASPPH, Friday, November 9, 2018

Dr. Jeff Duchin, health officer for the public health department in Seattle and King County, Washington, was elected to the Board of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Dr. Duchin is also a professor of medicine at the University of Washington, adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health and member of the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice.

Washington researcher takes part in study finding genetic risk for chronic inflammation

ASPPH, Friday, November 9, 2018
Genes contributing to immune and metabolic processes may contribute to chronic inflammation, suggests a new study of genomic data from more than 200,000 individuals. Findings were published online Nov. 1 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. An international team of researchers – including Dr. Bruce Psaty from the University of Washington School of Public Health – performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies and searched for genetic sites associated with circulating C-reactive protein, a marker for chronic inflammation.