School of Public Health

Epi In the NewsSubscribe to Epi In the News

Washington: Air pollution can accelerate progression of emphysema as much as a pack a day of cigarettes

ASPPH, Thursday, August 15, 2019

Researchers at the University of Washington have learned that ozone air pollution accelerates the progression of emphysema of the lung. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, is senior co-author of this study.
 

Increasing air pollution causes lung disease equivalent to smoking pack of cigarettes a day for 29 years

Newsweek, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Researchers from the University of Washington have concluded that air pollution, and especially pollution from ozone, accelerates the incidence of emphysema, a condition that can prevent an adequate amount of oxygen from entering the bloodstream. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was senior co-author of this study.

Air pollution can accelerate lung disease as much as a pack a day of cigarettes

UW News, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Air pollution — especially ozone air pollution which is increasing with climate change — accelerates the progression of emphysema of the lung, according to researchers at the University of Washington. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was senior co-author of this study.

Air pollution may be as harmful to your lungs as smoking cigarettes, study finds

NPR, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Researchers at the University of Washington have found that long-term exposure to slightly elevated levels of air pollution can be linked to accelerated development of lung damage, even among people who have never smoked. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was senior co-author of this study.

 

Air pollution is like smoking a pack of cigarettes a day to those with lung disease: Study

US News, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Researchers at the University of Washington have found that air pollution linked to climate change may worsen the progression of chronic lung disease, specifically emphysema. Dr. Joel Kaufman, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was senior co-author of this study.

Pregnant moms who breathe dirty air have children with lower IQs, study finds

KQED, Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Researchers at the University of Washington have found that pregnant women who are exposed to fine particles of air pollution have children with lower IQs compared to women with less daily exposure. Dr. Catherine Karr, adjunct professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, is an author of this study.

HOPE trial: Dapivirine vaginal ring reduces HIV risk by estimated 39%

Healio, Tuesday, August 6, 2019

An open-label study of women in southern and eastern Africa suggests that the dapivirine vaginal ring can be used well with good adherence by women at risk for HIV, which can reduce the risk of HIV infection. Dr. Jared Baeten, professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was lead investigator of this study.

How The U.S. compares with other countries in deaths from gun violence

NPR, Monday, August 5, 2019

The United States has the 28th-highest rate of deaths from gun violence in the world, while such instances in other countries are minimal to extremely rare. This brings into question why a country such as the United States experiences this level of gun violence. Dr. Ali Mokdad, adjunct professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, is quoted.

APRU Multi-Hazards Summer School 2019

Tohoku University, Friday, August 2, 2019

This annual event that takes place at Tohoku University draws lessons from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, and provides a platform for participants to discuss various disaster risk reduction (DRR) ideas and projects that have since been implemented. Haylea Hannah, doctoral student with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, was a participant of this event.

New test from San Diego’s Hologic is first in U.S. to help detect new STD threat

The San Diego Union-Tribune, Friday, August 2, 2019

San Diego’s Hologic company is the first in the nation to get a Mycoplasma genitalium test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This effort will help researchers get closer to understanding the infectious organism. Dr. Lisa Manhart, Professor with UW’s Department of Epidemiology, is quoted.